Category Archives: politics

Slipknot and Scaramucci

Image: Rob Ball/Getty Images

A few years back I attended a music event called Mayhem at SPAC. The things we do for people we love! Anyway, we had a really nice afternoon, complete with sandwiches from Cardona’s, listening to a bunch of bands. The bands weren’t really my genre, but, it wasn’t bad until Slipknot started their set. Their sound, costumes, performance, tone, everything about them, just offended my sensibilities. I’m not a metal girl, obviously, but the anger they incited in the audience went beyond a mere difference in musical appreciation. They scared me. We left.

I don’t like loud noises or yelling. Often when I’m home alone I don’t bother playing music or having the television on because I prefer the sound of quiet.

I was reminded of Slipknot this week when I read the New Yorker story about Scaramucci. His vulgar, crass tirade offended and frightened me. Who talks that? Certainly not any rational, intelligent people that I know. I’ve got a potty mouth at times myself, but the words he was using and directing at individuals were so beyond anything I could ever imagine saying. How is it possible that this vulgar, vile man has been asked to represent our country on any level?

Some of us have become almost numb to the constant barrage of information provided by our individual news feeds, while others don’t seem offended at all by the outrageous actions and transgressions of our current White House residents and their staff. How would these unperturbed people feel if their child’s school teacher bragged about being a P*ssy Grabber? Would these same folks appreciate it if their personal doctor or lawyer publicly criticized someone as “trying to suck their own c*ck?” Would that be ok for them?

I never imagined feeling more comfortable with Slipknot than with the government of my country. You see, I could simply leave the show that disturbed me. Leaving the country would be a whole lot more complicated.

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Filed under Music, musings, News, Observations, politics

I’ve been wondering…

Why don’t drivers open their car windows on beautiful days? I suppose some may have allergies or might be on a call, but it seems like lots of folks don’t ever let fresh air in.

If we’re all just a moment from a terrible diagnosis, an accident or a horrible tragedy how can we make today count?

How is it possible for so many people to believe in Donald Trump? What does he have to do before his followers will accept that he is unfit for office?

Does anyone else think that time is simply moving too fast? I miss the days when summers felt so long that I was convinced the flowering shrubs bordering our driveway bloomed twice.

Why does leaving my phone at home when I take a walk or go to dinner feel like a rebellion? Is it really necessary for us all to be instantaneously reachable?

When will we stop fighting about civil rights and access to health care and higher education? What makes anyone believe that they’re more deserving of any of these things than anyone else?

Do you miss civility and manners like I do?

If you could time travel, which way would you go – back or forward?

One of the primary lessons we teach children is to share. How does that tenet get forgotten by so many greedy adults?

Why is life so hard for so many and how can I help to make it better?

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Filed under musings, Observations, politics, Random

Signs, signs, everywhere there’s signs

Things are amping up here in Albany as the September mayoral primary approaches. Of course, the winner of the primary in our fair city is the de facto winner of the election. That’s just how things work in our overwhelmingly democratic capital city. I’ve noticed while driving and running around town that there are a lot of lawn signs for the candidates popping up, particularly it seems for Frank Commisso, Jr. They’re everywhere and their prevalence has caused me to wonder what the appeal is for this candidate who I perceive to be a newish face on an old machine. Maybe you can help me with that, reader?

I’ve got my candidate – I’ll be voting again for Kathy Sheehan. Out of all of the candidates, I believe she is the smartest and least inclined to work for her own interests. I’ve heard criticism about her lack of political savvy and some say she is merely performing her duties as a step towards a more elevated position. It’s ok. I’ll take intelligent and ambitious. I think she’s done a good job and is making positive changes for residents. Plus, I like her – she’s approachable, compassionate and we seem to share similar values. She’s got my vote.

There have been a number of folks polling and campaigning at my door already and I’ve signed a few petitions. The other two primary candidates have stopped by and I had a very nice conversation with Frank Commisso, Jr., but remain firm in my commitment to Mayor Sheehan. Maybe that’s why I was dismayed to find a Carolyn McLaughlin sign staked in my front garden when I returned from Cape Cod last week. I do have a first floor rental flat, though, and would certainly permit my tenant-friend to express his own political leanings by supporting his own candidate. When I saw him, I asked if he had given permission for the sign to be posted and he responded with surprise and said “I thought you put it there.” Hmmm. Nope.

Looking across the street, I noticed another McLaughlin sign staked in the front yard of a neighbor who I know to be traveling this summer. When I reached out to my neighbor and asked if she had approved the sign, she quickly said “No,” and asked me to remove it. Done. Both of “our” signs went into the trash last night. Now I’m left to wonder if those Commisso signs all over town might have also been distributed and posted without explicit permission. Regardless, let’s hope they’re removed post-primary as quickly as they’ve appeared. They’re blocking my scenery.

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Filed under Albany, DelSo, Local, politics, Uncategorized

Don’t confuse Fake News with the genuine story

Over the weekend, more significantly on the first of April, there was a bit of a brouhaha in the Times Union Blogoverse. Chuck Miller posted a piece that day, as he has every single day for some remarkable length of time, that claimed that Kellyanne Conway would be the speaker for the University of Albany’s 2017 spring commencement. When the headline came across one of my feeds, without even clicking through, I discerned that it was an April Fool’s Day joke and quickly moved on to something else I was more interested in reading. There were a lot of funny things published that particular day and honestly, that toy soldier outfit of Conway’s from Inauguration Day is a real turnoff.

Later in the day I heard there was some controversy about Chuck’s post. It seems that the editor of the Times Union felt compelled to have the blog post removed from the website and to go one step farther by Tweeting out an apology along with a four sentence story on times union.com:

A community blog hosted by timesunion.com falsely reported Saturday morning that Kellyanne Conway, a senior advisor to President Trump, would be the commencement speaker at the University at Albany. As soon as we were alerted to the post, we removed it from our site and suspended the blog. We apologize to anybody who was misled by this post, which was not written by a Times Union staff member. Even on April Fools’ Day, there’s no place for fake news under the Times Union banner.

To me, the most outrageous part of this entire episode is this undeniable truth: the newsroom at the Times Union, a place once filled with professionals, is a ghost town. In the last few years, reporters and editors and photographers have left the Times Union faster than Donald Trump jets to Mar-a-Lago every weekend.

Look at this list of names – Paul Block, Jordan Carleo-Evangelist, Michael P. Farrell, Bob Gardinier, Jen Gish, Paul Grondahl, Michael Huber, Tim O’Brien, Tracey Ormsbee, Ray Pitlyk, John Runfola, Cindy Schultz, Brianna Snyder and Dennis Yusko. All have left the Times Union in the past year or so. Yes, Rex, the offending blog post was not written by a Times Union staff member because, in fact, there are hardly any of them left.

When newspapers make the decision to buy printing presses and build community meeting space rather than pay professionals to cover real stories, what they become are blog hosts and slide show click bait. At a time when real news reporting has never been more critical, the editor of the Times Union and the corporation that owns it have become a media joke. Kind of like the blog post that started all of this.

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Filed under Local, News, Observations, politics, Rants

Who are you?

Yeah, you. My reader. It’s been more than 7 years, 2 domains and a divorce since DelSo was born. Over the years I’ve shared a lot of my life and self here, in print. You, as a reader, have come to know me on some level from my words. What makes you return here (assuming you’re not new around these parts) and read what I write? Let me remind you of some of what I’ve related to you in the hope that you might feel inclined to share with me – who you are, reader? Why are you here?

There have been so many miles – more plane rides than I could have ever imagined, along with  runs and races and road trips. I’ve  explored cities with my boys and my girlfriends and solo. My feet have run in a half dozen different countries and probably about the same number of states.

My home has evolved from a house with two full-time parents to one of three part-time children. There have been physical improvements, rooms repurposed and painted, new rugs and furniture rearranged. It feels different. After a refinance or two, I know it’s mine.

I’ve written about books I’ve read and movies and concerts I’ve seen. Increasingly, politics and my dismay with our current leadership have been topics I’ve felt compelled to write about.

My children and the challenges of being a parent frequently provide fodder for posts. While the joys outweigh the frustrations, parenthood remains a roller coaster ride that keeps me on the edge of my seat with a scream threatening to escape. It’s a heart racing ride.

Sometimes I cook or bake and post recipes and photos of the fruits of my labors. Food and wine are a big part of my life and I’ve happily shared my experiences with you.  Oh – and there’s that wine bar that I own.

There have been times when I wrote with sadness or anger, but I think I mostly write from a place of understanding and acceptance. Balance and moderation are woven throughout much of what I write.

Health and wellness have been covered and the miracle of menopause has been mentioned.  The heartbreak of addiction and the threat of cancer have been present. I’ve learned to ski and have found bliss in pigeon pose in a room heated to 100+ degrees.

It’s all here – my life.  Not perfect, not necessarily what I ever imagined it to be, but a life that I feel grateful for in a city that I have come to love.

Will you tell me why you visit my life?

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Is this what you voted for?

Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images

I don’t understand the appeal of Donald Trump, but I have to respect the fact that 63 million Americans voted for him. Of course, according to Pew Research, that’s about 2.8 million less than Clinton won, but whatever. It’s done.

My question, and I’ll reiterate – is this what you voted for?

  • Did you vote for Trump’s draining of the swamp, that now appears to be more a filling of the pond with yachts?
  • Are the white men and women being nominated and appointed to the cabinet representing you and your interests in a way that makes you feel confident?
  • Is his message of nationalism reverberating for you in a positive way? You don’t find it to be a distraction from the fact that our country is incredibly wealthy but that the few elite at the top possess a portion of the wealth that is beyond a reasonable percentage?
  • When you voted for a man with zero diplomatic or political experience because you wanted change, was the type of international chaos we’re now seeing what you had in mind?
  • Donald Trump impressed with his blunt words. Were the blatant lies part of the package for which you voted?
  • As legal American residents and refugees in crisis are detained at airports around the nation and the world due to the rash actions of Donald Trump, and patriotic and compassionate Americans protest in ever increasing numbers, I ask again, is this what you voted for?

I was shocked and disappointed by the results of the election last fall. Although Donald Trump wasn’t my choice, I was prepared to accept the outcome and tried to be optimistic about what he might achieve. I fervently hoped he would prove me wrong and evolve into a leader who would represent our country in a manner in which I might feel pride.

I did not vote for this.

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Filed under News, politics

Living the dystopian dream

As a young adult librarian I read a lot of books. I have to – it’s my job. When I’m not reading books, often I’m talking about them as I try to get kids excited about different titles. In recent years, some of the most popular fiction books have been kind of dark and usually part of a trilogy. Think Hunger Games, Divergent, Matched, all set in a bleak future which I can’t imagine any of us would want to live in. Kids love them.

In the past week I’ve heard a lot of words that are reminiscent of that particular genre of books. Words like Resistance, Protest, Chaos, Rebellion, Corruption and Power. I’m not suggesting that we’ve arrived in a post-apocalyptic and dystopian society, but I’m saying that, to me, the similarities are undeniable.  Our government is actively and aggressively shutting down and drowning out voices that refute their party line. We’re being spoon fed official falsehoods and government agencies are being muzzled for sharing scientific truths. I’ve never been more fearful of our country’s leadership and international representation.

These words, written by George Orwell in a letter in 1944, have never been more relevant –

“…the horrors of emotional nationalism and a tendency to disbelieve in the existence of objective truth because all the facts have to fit in with the words and prophecies of some infallible führer.”

The number one selling book right now on Amazon is 1984. There’s an excellent essay in the New York Times about why this book, written in 1948, is a must read for 2017.

Has anyone seen Katniss?

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Filed under Books, Libraries, musings, News, Observations, politics