Category Archives: television

The miseducation of Megyn Kelly

EA35741F-D438-4A06-BCD2-191A164884E8Last spring I ran a half marathon in NYC, kind of a bucket list item if I were to have such a thing. I originally registered for the race because a childhood friend brought it to my attention and it sounded fun. Anything to go to NYC, you know?

It wasn’t the cheapest half I’ve ever run, but I was ok with the entry fee because it was an all women race and I think there may have been some charity component to it. Until I saw that Megyn Kelly was the media sponsor for the event, that is. Then, in all honesty, I considered bailing because, yes, she bothers me that much.

195CD914-570A-4548-A772-0D5CFDE6FBE8Why? Because anyone willing to sit down with, provide a forum to, and pose for photos with, a man who denies that the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School ever occurred, is despicable, in my opinion. I’m not going to even mention his name because I find him so reprehensible, but I’m sure you know about whom I’m speaking. I have some understanding about journalism and the fact that media professionals don’t necessarily endorse the beliefs of those they interview, but, this guy has deeply offended and caused pain to families who lost their children in a horrific way. He doesn’t get a pass, nor does she, in my book.

Yesterday, I hosted a Halloween related event in my library and I was a bit dismayed by the some of the behavior I observed. We had set out some snacks for the kids, like you do, but failed to stand guard at the table where the huge box of goldfish crackers, Oreo cookies, clementines and candy corn were being offered. Without direct adult supervision, the middle school kids were shockingly selfish about helping themselves to as much as they wanted to have without consideration of the fact that the kids behind them might end up with nothing. I was kind of appalled. I wanted and expected better.

Reflecting on it last night, I couldn’t help but see a parallel between the pattern of actions of Ms. Kelly, beginning with that controversial interview referenced above, and those of the children yesterday afternoon. There’s a sense of entitlement and lack of consideration for anyone but themselves that, quite honestly, repulses me on some level.  This failure to demonstrate empathy for parents who have lost their children, and, on a much smaller scale, those who may not enjoy the same treats we have due to our own greediness, distresses me.

What do we expect from our children? What should we expect from personalities who want to be in our homes via social and more traditional media? I want and expect better. How about you?

 

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Filed under Education, Libraries, Local, moms, musings, Observations, politics, Schools, television, upstate New York

A Star is Born – in two takes

2573C958-C5A5-4FC8-9295-F9C63732A587The media blitz worked.  I needed to see the Bradley Cooper version of A Star is Born and I planned to make a Saturday matinee. But first, I needed to see the 1976 version with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. Hello, Friday night and Amazon Prime.

I was 10 when that version was released and I don’t recall seeing it, although the song, “Evergreen,” certainly landed on my radar. That particular song, along with “The Way We Were,” was one of the first songs I remember crying to during the those overly emotional pre-puberty days. More than forty years later, it remains a tragic romance tour de force and I loved hearing it as part of the soundtrack. To be honest, it was the only song I found listenable in the entire film. The rest was just awful – and while Kris Kristofferson may have been  a delight to look at, his voice was just terrible. 

Back to the positive…Barbra Streisand’s wardrobe was totally on point and I loved everything about her appearance. Many of her outfits were extremely low cut, but there was no silicone spillage and she just looked great. That cream colored sweater she wore at the first concert is my current obsession and I’m requesting any and all assistance in landing one just like it for my own wardrobe. Get on it, please.

So, you could say that I wasn’t really too impressed.

On Saturday I settled into my seat at the Spectrum for the early showing of the latest remake.  An aside – if it’s not playing at that particular theater, I’m not going.  The opening scene with Bradley Cooper shredding his guitar to a song that I wouldn’t mind hearing again, immediately grabbed me. It took me twenty minutes or so to realize that I was physically on the edge of my seat trying to get closer to the action on the screen. He was absolutely compelling and, basely, totally friggin’ hot. Oh – and he can sing!

When Lady Gaga hit the screen, I was delighted, and the first time I heard her sing I was completely blown away. La Vie en Rose is one of my favorite overwrought ballads and her performance was magic. I loved her look and found her completely believable and genuine. Wow.

So, the movie was a little long with some extraneous character development, but since it meant more time in the dark with Bradley and Gaga, it wasn’t a problem for me. The music was really terrific with songs I can actually imagine purchasing and adding to my Apple library. The performances were sincere and  totally believable and I absolutely loved this film. 

Guess I need to check out the Judy Garland version. How about you? Have you seen any/all of the Star is Born movies? What’s your favorite?

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Filed under art, favorites, Local, Movies, Music, Observations, Recommendations, television, Uncategorized

Films x 5

I’ve been on a bit of a tear recently when it comes to watching movies. I’ve seen 5 in the last couple of weeks, a combination of new releases and catching up on older releases that I hadn’t previously seen. It’s kind of what happens when you’ve exhausted all the other options in our Hulu, Netflix, Amazon Prime household.

First up was the latest Spider-Man flick – Spider-Man:Homecoming. By no means have I have seen every incarnation of this superhero series, but this one is up there in terms of my favorite versions. It’s really nice to go to a movie with my 12 year-old and not have a single awkward moment prompted by whatever is being displayed onscreen. The movie had light moments, Peter Parker had a buddy, the cast was good (and wasn’t exclusively white) and Robert Downey, Jr had a number of scenes. Definitely worth seeing in the theater.

Next, on a customer friend’s recommendation, was The Great Beauty. It’s been a long time since a movie with subtitles, other than Manga, was viewed on my old television and this one was compelling enough to make me seek out more. The images of Rome have me beyond excited for next winter’s trip and there was a lovely melancholia that has stuck with me even days later. The scene when Jeb takes a woman down verbally is brutal, but I saw enough beauty in the film to keep me interested until the end.

We were back at the Spectrum a second Saturday to see the newly released Dunkirk. Two of my three boys are huge European history fans and they constantly teach me about geography and war. I’d never heard of Dunkirk before, but the story is remarkable and I really liked this movie. The images of those men and boys fighting for survival and to save one another is powerful and my respect for soldiers knows no bounds. I also really appreciated Christopher Nolan’s handling of the material – lots of tension, yet no blood or gore. Looks like Dunkirk is now on the list as a potential destination for Quinn’s 2020 trip, along with Paris and Bruges.

On a quiet Sunday evening I came across 20th Century Women, a movie I wanted to love, but ultimately only liked a little bit. Annette Bening is an actress that I admire and I enjoyed her performance, but the movie just didn’t feel cohesive to me. It was like a cake that is missing some critical ingredient. Meh. I hope to see her again in something more worthy of her talents, but I wouldn’t recommend bothering to see this one.

Lion, though, I very much enjoyed. The young actor who portrayed the main character as a child was amazing. His chocolate brown eyes spoke volumes and I couldn’t stop thinking about his resilience under the awful circumstances he found himself in. I don’t imagine my own children could have survived if they were faced with the same challenges. The movie, based upon a true story, is a genuine tear jerker, but it ends on a high note and watching Dev Patel for an hour plus was not a struggle. He is a very handsome man.

So, what have you seen recently?

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Filed under Movies, Observations, Recommendations, Summer, television

Words can hurt, words can help

Recently the news has been filled reports about the YA book turned Netflix miniseries, 13 Reasons Why. I’ve read quite a few articles about the series and understand the potential for the program to “trigger” a reaction in those overwhelmed by depression and other issues that leave them vulnerable to the suggestion that suicide is a resolution to their struggles. I’ve already expressed my thoughts about suicide and the impact on those who are left behind to carry the weight of loss. That’s not my topic today.

I want to share something that happened yesterday that I can’t stop thinking about.

Each year at “my” library we are fortunate enough to schedule an author visit for our students. In the past we’ve targeted a particular grade, carefully rotating things around so that no class graduates without having had the opportunity to listen to a published author share their work and life story. This year we “split” an author, Ben Mikaelsen, with another suburban school district. Mr. Mikaelsen lives in Montana and being able to divide his expenses with another district made it possible for us to meet his honorarium and travel costs. It was kind of a big deal for us to have such an established author visit and we maximized our time with him by scheduling three individual presentations. All of our students would be able to listen to our special guest, and some would even be able to have lunch with him.

Lunch seems like such a simple thing, but I’m now convinced it can be so much more.

The presentations were engaging and the students were a great audience. Mikaelsen shared stories from his own childhood about being bullied and being a bully himself. He talked about the inherent weakness of bullies and the importance of writing our own stories, life stories that we create and reside within. He implored students to begin writing their own life stories the very minute they walked out of the auditorium and I could see the kids mulling the weightiness of his words.

Midday we had a couple of dozen students join the author for sandwiches and conversation in the Library Media Center, including one last minute addition that our principal sent down because he felt it would be a positive and meaningful experience for the child. After we ate, students filtered through getting their books signed until only one student remained, the one selected by the principal. The student approached Ben Mikaelsen and quietly said “I have a question for you.” After receiving an encouraging nod from the author, the child continued. “When does the bullying stop?”

I stepped away, tears in my eyes, to give them time to talk. Their conversation lasted a few minutes, enough time for me to grab an extra copy of one of Ben’s books, Touching Spirit Bear, and my camera. Ben signed the book for the child and they posed together for a photo. I’d like to think that young person left the library with far more than they had when they had arrived. And a book, too.

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Filed under Boys, Observations, Schools, television

13 Reasons Why (I struggle with suicide)

About 30 years ago a friend of mine committed suicide. His name was John and he was sweet with a mop of messy hair and jeans that sagged years before it became the trend. He had a kind and strong heart, along with a sense of responsibility that once found him driving behind his cousin and me one night after we had all been out far too late, just to make sure we got home safely. I’ll never forget him.

It never fails to make me sad when I think of him. So much living has happened since that day he took his life with a gun, living that he has missed. It would have gotten better, I think. The disagreement or sadness that caused him to believe his only option was to depart would have become less overwhelming. I just know it.

Since that first suicide there have been others, none however to anyone I was closer to than John. The distance between me and those other, more recently lost souls only provided a single buffer – I was exempt somehow from the guilt of feeling as if I could have done something to prevent the ultimate outcome. That being said, there’s no escape from witnessing the pain of those who are left behind and that’s my biggest issue with suicide – the neverending question of what we survivors could have done to convince that person not to end their life.

After having read the book years ago, I’ve been watching the Netflix series that folks have been talking about, 13 Reasons Why. I binged out on a number of episodes, although my attention sometimes wanders. I think the characters are a little too self aware for high school kids and the tattoos and drugs seem unrealistic. I have, though, been impressed with some of the acting and the creative way the plot and characters were developed to provide material for 13 episodes. The music is pretty good, too.

Regardless of the presentation of the material, the take away for me is this: the pain of the person who takes their own life ends with their last breath. That’s the moment for those of us remaining, when it just begins. Our lives are not better without them, but they continue. We miss them eternally and their absence is a void we’ll never fill.

Even thirteen reasons will never be enough.

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Filed under Books, girlhood, Observations, television

The profoundness of This is Us

0699394b-931b-490e-8940-e5c39b5b6cfb-6194-00000420a2ffb43e_tmpAs is usual for me and television, I’m more than a little late to the game on one of the buzziest new series, This is Us.  I needed something to follow an embarrassing number of binge watched seasons of Project Runway and was pleased to see that TiU was available on Hulu. A single episode in and I was hooked. Talk about rich. What characters! Such dialogue! The soundtrack! I’m obsessed.

Episode 2 reached into my head and my heart simultaneously and I haven’t been able to shake it yet. There were two scenes involving Mandy Moore’s character, Rebecca, that have stuck with me and they’ve been both inspiring and grounding. The first was a conversation between Rebecca’s husband, Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) and his best friend, Miguel (Jon Huertas). Miguel tells Jack that Rebecca is “…like the gold standard of wives. She’s smart, funny, beautiful, great personality…”

It was a line that made me want to be Rebecca. That’s the kind of woman who I want to be.

The other scene was between Jack and Rebecca. As they sat on the floor next to each other, after a night of sleeping apart, Jack said that when he first met her he finally knew what he wanted to be when he grew up – the man to make her happy. Ugh. Shot to the solar plexus.

That’s the kind of man who I want.

This is Us feels, to me, something like who we hope for.

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Filed under aging, family, favorites, love, marriage, Music, Observations, Recommendations, relationships, television

A sweet day

img_0782When I finally sat down on the couch last evening, I couldn’t help but exclaim “I’m sitting down!” It seemed like a long time coming. It had been a wonderfully, full and satisfying three-day weekend and I felt well-prepared for what promises to be another overflowing with appointments, meetings and commitments week. Monday was an awesome bonus, without which I would have most certainly been overwhelmed instead of merely contentedly tired.

The day began with breakfast and the completion, after three days, of my reading of the Sunday paper. This feat was followed by some Lark + Lily work – editing our new fall menu and updated wine list along with payroll. There’s no holiday from payroll! Once the business responsibilities were met, for the moment, household chores moved to the forefront. Three loads of laundry, bed changing, a quick vacuum, and a shuffling of sheets and wardrobe to accommodate the new season. Then it was off to the bank, the optician (Quinn’s glasses mysteriously turned up broken) and Hewitt’s for (more) mums.

Nine pots of mums ensconced in my car, I got lucky and found parking remarkably near to the restaurant and took on the task of replanting our four window boxes to reflect autumn. An hour or so later, sidewalk swept and flowers watered, I headed back home to meet one of the Lunar b*tches for an afternoon run. It was such a treat to run in shorts that we stretched our loop into 7+ miles. These warm days are definitely numbered, but there is consolation in the anticipation of cross-country skiing.

The early evening was a flurry of boy energy – lots of physical contact and guffawing all around. I finally cooked up those dumplings and we all enjoyed a tasty and easy dinner. And then things finally started to slow down…

I watched an episode of Chef’s Table, followed by an episode of Transparent and some quality time with a pint of Haagen Daz Swiss Vanilla Almond. I had a moment with my foam roller, followed by a hot shower, and then crawled into bed. Days like this may be exhausting, but I prefer to think of them as fully and well lived. I don’t think that’s a bad thing to shout about on a day known as the feast of trumpets.

 

 

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Filed under Boys, Dinner, family, friends, holidays, Random, running, television